Spring Awakening – The Boys

Spring Awakening weekend #2 is upon is! Tonight, the cast endeavors to perform at 8 pmAND at midnight! That’s like 6 straight hours of dancing, singing, and acting really hard!

Meanwhile, Inside Cabaret sat down with the entire cast of Spring Awakening and asked some real hardball questions. Here’s a sample:

Inside Cabaret: What is your least favorite color?

Nick: Yellow

Jenna: Olive

Will: F**K… I like them all!

Alex: Brown

Jordon: Purple

Tyler: Orange

Amanda: Murky Yellow

Francesca: Orange

Lauren: I like all colors! Except pea green.

Marc: Sherbet. Orange Sherbet.

Meg: PINK

Joey: Salmon. Definitely Salmon. And green. I hate green.

The Boys.

Real heavy stuff, right? Just kidding. We here at Inside Cabaret have something called “journalistic integrity.” The actual interview with the cast will be split into two parts. The first part–an interview with the illustrious boy members of the cast–can be found below!

###

Inside Cabaret: What drew you to Spring Awakening? What experience with SA before, and how does this compare?

Will: It came out at a time when it really applied to my life. Not in any—not that I related to any of the events, but I did relate to the pressure of the world. That’s like the driving force between the show. This is like, the last stand, the final frontier before being thrust into the world. We’ve been trained to be graded for so long, and we’ll only be graded on what we do now.

Will Carey, pre-amber-waves-of-grain hairstyle. Circa 2009. Still Rock & Roll.

IC:You saw it on Broadway? How has doing the show compared?

Will: Yeah, I saw it sitting next to my mom. This show is so much more than what the original production was. The emotions are raw and easily accessible in any. We could do this outside and it’d be the perfect thing. We’re right there, in the audience’s face, telling them this story.

IC: Nick, you were doing BARE with the Livingston Theatre Company when the process started. How did you make the jump between shows?

Nick: It was very easy for me because of the people I was working with. The cast and the pro staff are full of people that I love—People that I’m already comfortable with. So I had no problems trying things out and jumping into the characters.

IC:I imagine part of that is because of director Farnaz Mansouri. You’ve worked with her before. How has this one compared?

Nick: Yeah, working with Farnaz was a big part of that. Especially the way she conveys her ideas; they’re very complete and full. And because it’s her second show, she’s knocked a lot of the kinds out. It’s been a great experience.

Nick Cartusciello acting.

IC: Marc, this is your 4th show with Cabaret this year. How is this one different?

Marc: Spring Awakening is so different in that it’s such a story – it has such a narrative. It’s the first show that I’ve done in which the large cast has to work together. Working with a legitimate ensemble, it’s such a different dynamic.

IC: How has the process been different?

Marc: This time, I definitely focused on creating a sense of style about how I did everything –singing, crafting, moving, dancing, emotional expression – this show was very stylized in that sense.

"Style."

IC: How have you improved as a performer?

Marc: I’ve gotten worse and worse, because I’ve gotten more and more egotistical.

(::Laughs from the belly::)

No, I think that this season has allowed me to grow so much because of the variety in each show and each process. Each show has allowed me to take something and bring it to the next show. For example, for the Revue, I figured out how to work an audience, with Elegies, it was building a show from the ground up with a cast of actors, which played directly into HIL2D, which was more about crafting and physicality, which in turn plays into that style I was talking about before. Being aware of controlling all of those skills and facets was so different and so powerful. Was that confusing?

(Editor’s note: No.)

IC: Joey, Between directing two musicals and the managing director position in the past, you have done a lot of varied work at Cabaret Theatre. What is it like coming back to be an actor after having spent much of your undergraduate years working off stage?

Joey: It’s been exciting. The last time I performed on-stage in-role for Cabaret was Eurydice, which was September 2009. That’s like almost 3 years ago. I’ve spent most of my time telling people how to act and move, so coming back and trying to do it myself was a nice change of pace.

IC: Given your previous positions and the fact that you’re older than everyone else, do you see yourself as a mentor to the cast in any way?

Joey: First of all, I’m only one year older. The other day, Marc said I was the only person born in the 1980s in the cast, trying to make it seem like I was some dinosaur. I was born in ’89! In June! That’s like almost 1990!

Dramatic s**t.

Second of all, no, I don’t really see myself as a mentor, primarily because the members in this cast are so damn talented, regardless of age or number of shows. I had enough trouble doing the whole singing thing, so I looked to other cast members and prostaff members for help with that. Maybe they looked to me for acting or moving tips, but Farnaz and Co. did a great job of creating an environment in which we all mentored and supported each other, regardless of how old I might (not) be.

IC: Jordon, It’s your first show at Cabaret and at college. What’s in been like? How is it different from your past experiences?

Jordon: It’s been great! It’s different than high school because of the short time to do a show; instead of 3 months, you get 1 month. You’re told to do something, and you just have to work hard to get it done. In a lot of ways, it’s better.

IC: Why’s it better?

Jordon: Well, everyone has talent. Versus like in high school where a select few get showcased all the time. In college, you’re expected to come in knowing your s**t.

Chair Acting.

IC:What have you learned about yourself as a performer?

Jordon: About developing character. The whole show requires it. In high school, the shows are more airy and light-hearted. Here, it’s like “how can you contribute to this,” “what do you bring?” That was a great challenge for me.

IC: Finally, Tyler, why isSpring Awakeningso important and influential?

Tyler: Because it’s important to remember that no one is or can be perfect. And that the best we can be is honest.

IC: Why has this show been an important process for you?

Tyler: Because it requires constant vigilance of character.  As Hanschen, I’m constantly making sure he looks and appears perfect. I have to be on at all times; it’s really challenged me to become a better actor and performer.

Tyler and Nick being Rock Stars and stuff

 ###

So there you have it, True Believers! An interview with the dashing dudes of Spring Awakening! Stay tuned for an interview with the ladies regarding such hot topics as rock and roll, sexuality, stage combat, and curly hair!

Also, you may have noticed that a certain boy–or rather, MAN–was missing from the interviews. His name is Boris Van Der Ree. He plays the Adult Male roles in the show. And he bounced from yesterday’s brush-up rehearsal before Inside Cabaret could ask him any question. Alas, we’ll just have to settle for this lovely picture of him:

Enjoy

Advertisements